Taking the Leap

Do I go for? Do I not? Is it a smart idea? Is it the right thing for me to do? Is it what God has planned for me? What if it is the right thing and I do not do it? What if is is not the right thing and I do do it?  Is this a selfish choice?

These are all questions that I have asked myself many times, but they have popped up a lot recently as I have considered taking a job in a new place where I do not really know anyone and I could not even tell you how to get to the McDonald’s let alone Kroger or Wal-Mart.  I have asked these questions as I decide to move to my 4th city in a less than a year and as I am around a month away from moving yet still do not have a place to live.  These questions and more are all ones that have been brought up in my mind as my church has been going through a series called “What If?”

So this week when Jason preached on What if you took that leap? I was really impacted.  I had already felt sure that going to BC was the thing I was supposed to do, but even that hadn’t stopped the questions and I can’t say that there aren’t still moments when I ask if this is the right thing, but I have been put at peace with where I am headed.

Here are some of the highlights from the sermon that really spoke to me.

We were examining this question using text from 1 Samuel 14.  Where Jonathan and his armor bearer move sneak away from their army and go to the Philistine outpost. (To get all the details you should totally read the story).

In this story Jonathan had conditions that looked really bad and appeared stacked against him, but he considers the situation and the facts and trusts in the Lord’s provision.  He didn’t just blindly make this decision, but he didn’t let all the What if this and that questions get in his way of taking the leap.

The more impressive part about the story deals with the armor bearer, who from what I know about history and Jason filled in is young, unexperienced, and weaponless.  Yet when Jonathan asks him to go with him to the outpost he follows with out hesitation.  He doesn’t have a weapon, let alone know how to use it, and is headed straight into the opposing army.

Through Jonathan and the armor bearer we can see that the leap is not contingent on our conditions nor our expertise and is not done blindly.  Taking a leap means having courage.  Instead of asking all of the questions, that do not get us anywhere and are really quite stupid, we should just stop and say I’ll do whatever.

There is one more person in this story to consider and that is Saul, Jonathan’s father.  He is the king and is leading the army into battle.  At the time that Jonathan and his armor bearer sneak off he is camped out under the pomegranate tree.  Waiting, he is full of fear and panic.  He is also engaging in a form of idol worship because the tree means more than just a place for shade and rest, it is an idol in their land.

The same thing happens to us when we are not using what God has given us to honor him.  When our time is more consumed with what our Facebook friends did on Friday night, what the trending topic on Twitter is right now, or who the newest “it” couple is then we are engaging in a form of idol worship.

After the sermon I was no longer thinking constantly about if the choices I was making about BC were the right thing or wrong thing and so on, but instead this is what I have been asking myself:

1. What am I holding higher than God (What is my pomegranate tree?)?

2. Am I Saul? OR Am I Jonathan and the Armor Bearer?

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